MILAN P. SHIPKA, Ph.D.  Assistant Professor of Animal Science

University of Alaska Fairbanks

 Animal Scientist
     Extension Specialist
 Department of Plant, Animal & Soil Science
     Alaska Cooperative Extension Service
 School of Agriculture & Land Resources Management
     College of Rural Alaska
Agricultural & Forestry Experiment Station

 

tel. (907) 474 - 7429 fax (907) 474 - 6184 e-mail  ffmps@uaf.edu

EDUCATION:

    Ph.D.        1996        Utah State University, Department of Biology 
                                        Emphasis - Animal Physiology
    M.S.          1990         Iowa State University, Departments of Animal Science and Animal Ecology 
                                        Emphasis - Physiology of Reproduction
    B.S.           1983        University of Minnesota 
                                        Majors:    Animal Science and Agricultural Economics

 

EMPLOYMENT:

 1999-Present              University of Alaska Fairbanks, Animal Scientist & Extension Livestock Specialist 
                                        Assistant Professor
 1997-1999                   Utah State University, Director of the Caine Dairy Teaching & Research Center 
                                        Research Assistant Professor
 1991-1996                   Utah State University, Director of the Caine Dairy Teaching & Research Center 
                                        Research Instructor
 1986-1991                   Iowa State University, Research Station Superintendent
 1983-1985                   University of Nebraska - Lincoln, Manager, Mead Field Laboratory & Research Center
 1981-1983                   University of Minnesota, Herdsman, Rosemount Agricultural Research Station

 

SOCIETY MEMBERSHIPS:

    Society for Study of Reproduction
    American Society of Animal Science

 

RESEARCH INTERESTS:

    Applied animal reproduction
    Physiology/Behavioral interactions
    Management of domestic and non-traditional ruminant livestock species

 

CURRENT ADJUNCT APPOINTMENTS

    Center for Reproducive Biology ­ Washington State University
    Department of Animal, Dairy,and Veterinary Science ­ Utah State University

 

CURRENT TEACHING RESPONSIBILITIES:

    NRM 320                                                       Fall Semester                                                             3 Credits
    Introduction to Animal Science:  Origin, history, and economic significance of breeds of dairy and beef cattle, swine, sheep,
    and poultry.  Discussion of reindeer, bison, and musk oxen.  Management and production systems with special reference to
    Alaska. Prerequisite: A course in college general biology.

 

PREVIOUS TEACHING EXPERIENCE:

 Course Title
          Institute
 Dairy Farm Production Practices (Lower Division Undergraduate)
          Iowa State University and Utah State University
 Dairy Cattle Reproduction and Artificial Insemination (L. Div. Und.)
          Utah State University
 Dairy Catlle Nutrition (L. Div. Und.)
          Utah State University
 Physiology of Lactation (Upper Division Undergraduate)
          Utah State University
 Physiology of Reproduction and Lactation (U. Div. Und.)
          Utah State University
 Physiology of Reproduction (Graduate)
          Utah State University
 Dairy Cattle Management (U. Div. Und.)
          Utah State University
 Dairy Farm Management (U. Div. Und.)
          Iowa State University
 Dairy Cattle Management (Grad.)
          Utah State University

 

PUBLICATIONS:

Dissertation and Thesis

Shipka, M.P.  1996.  The influence of bull exposure and bull presence on postpartum reproductive physiology and behavior of high-producing dairy cows.  Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation, Utah State University, Logan, UT.

Shipka, M.P.  1990.  Relationship of endogenous estrogen and progesterone to the onset of maternal behavior in the ewe.  Master of Science Thesis, Iowa State University, Ames, IA.

Scientific Articles (peer reviewed)

1.    Shipka, M.P. 2000.  A note on silent ovulation identified by using radiotelemetry for estrous detection.  Appl. Anim. Behav. Sci. 66: 153-159.

2.    Shipka, M.P. and L.C. Ellis. 1999.  Effects of bull exposure on postpartum reproductive physiology of dairy cows.  Anim. Reprod. Sci. 54: 237 - 244.

3.    Wolfe, M.L., M.P. Shipka and J.F. Kimball. 1999.  Unique patterns of reproduction within the Antelope Island bison herd.  Great Basin Naturalist  59: 105 - 111.

4.    Shipka, M.P. and L.C. Ellis.  1998.  No effect of bull exposure on estrous behavior in high-producing dairy cows.  Appl. Anim. Behav. Sci. 57:1-7.

5.    Shipka, M.P. and L.C. Ellis.  1996.  Bull presence suppresses postpartum ovarian reactivation in dairy cattle.  Proc. WSASAS 47:225.

6.    Stevenson, J.S., Y. Kobayashi, M.P. Shipka, and K.C. Rauchholz.  1996.  Gonadotropin-releasing hormone preceding prostaglandin F2a-induced luteolysis alters pregnancy rates in dairy cattle.  J. Dairy Sci. 79:402.

7.    Shipka, M.P. and C.W. Arave.  1995.  Influence of extended manager lock-up on cow behavior and production factors in dairy cattle management.  Proc. WSASAS 46:84.

8.    Shipka, M.P. and S.P. Ford.  1991.  Relationship of circulating estrogen and progesterone concentrations during late pregnancy and the onset of maternal behavior in the ewe.  Appl. Anim. Behav. Sci. 31:91.

Scientific Abstracts (peer reviewed)

1.    Shipka, M.P., C.B. Holmes, T.L. Wierenga, K.E. Panter, and R.C. Lamb. 1998.  Use of radiotelemetry, visual observation and progesterone assay to determine true silent ovulation.  J. Anim. Sci. 76:216.

2.    Shipka, M.P. and L.C. Ellis.  1996.  Bull exposure has no effect on estrous behavior in dairy cattle.  Proc. Intnatl. Congress, ISAE 30:139.

3.    Shipka, M.P. and L.C. Ellis.  1996.  Bull exposure effects postpartum ovarian reactivation in dairy cows.  J. Anim. Sci. 74:232.

4.    Arave, C.W., M.P. Shipka, J. Morrow-Tesch, and J.L. Albright.  1996.  Changes in serum cortisol following extended lock-up time of lactating cows.  J. Dairy Sci. 79 (Suppl. 1):191.

5.    Arave, C.W., D. Bolinger, M.P. Shipka, and J.L. Albright.  1996.  Effect of extended lock-up of lactating cows on milk production, feed intake, and behavior.  J. Anim. Sci. 74 (Suppl. 1):43.

6.    Shipka, M.P., M.L. Wolfe, and J.F. Kimball.  1995.  Reproductive patterns of an island bison population.  Proc. Natl. Conf. Wildl. Soc. 2:123.

7.    Shipka, M.P., A.J. Conley, A.E. Pusateri, R.O. Harrison, T.B. Hoehns, and S.P. Ford.  1989.  Relationships of steroid hormones to maternal behavior in the ewe.  J. Anim. Sci. 67:106.

Extension and Popular Press

1.    Shipka, M.P. 2001. Farm Animal Obstetrics. Alaska Livestock Series. LPM-00440. Cooperative Extension Service. University of Alaska Fairbanks.

2.    Shipka, M.P., G.J. Holmes, and C.B. Campbell.  1998.  Radiotelemetry for estrous detection in dairy cows.  Progressive Dairyman.

3.    Shipka, M.P.,G.L. Holmes, and C.R. Campbell.  1998.  Use of radiotelemetry for estrous detection in dairy herds.  USU Extension Fact Sheet and USU Veterinary Newsletter.

4.    Shipka, M.P., J.W. Call and C.V. Bagley.  1992.  A comparison of two cold weather teat dipping practices.  USU Extension Fact Sheet and USU Veterinary Newsletter.

5.    Shipka, M.P. and S.P. Ford.  1990.  Prepartum steroid hormone concentrations and postpartum maternal behavior.  Iowa State University 1990 Beef and Sheep Research Report.

6.    Shipka, M.P.  1990.  Comparison of four types of freestall bedding practices by cow preference.  ISU Extension Fact Sheet.

7    Eldredge, F. and M.P. Shipka.  1986.  Managing the research herd.  University of Nebraska 1986 Dairy Report.